Black Lodge House Band!!
Black Lodge House Band!!

The House band of Black Lodge is hanging with our costume designer Victor Wilde in LA!

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TIMUR
TIMUR

Photo by Sandra Powers Clothing by Bohemian Society

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Brookledge Follies
Brookledge Follies

The original Magic Castle

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Black Lodge House Band!!
Black Lodge House Band!!

The House band of Black Lodge is hanging with our costume designer Victor Wilde in LA!

press to zoom
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BLACK LODGE

Streaming now on Opera Philadelphia TV

 

Set in a nightmarish Bardo, a place between death and rebirth, a tormented writer (Timur) faces down demons of his own making. Forced to confront the darkest moment in his life, he mines fractured and repressed memories for a way out. A woman (Jennifer Harrison Newman) is at the center of all the writer’s afterlife encounters. She is the subject of his life’s greatest regret. Redefining rock-opera for the 21st century, Black Lodge takes viewers through a surreal psychological escape room, inspired by the investigators of darkness David Lynch and William S. Burroughs.

Performed with Isaura String Quartet. Produced by Beth Morrison Projects for Opera Philadelphia, and Executive Produced by Thurston Moore of Sonic Youth. Composed by Grammy-nominated David T. Little, with lyrics by Beat generation poet Anne Waldman, screenplay and direction by Michael Joseph McQuilken. 

"Spectacular vocal and emotional range"

Broad Street Review

"Black Lodge is a dark, unredemptive vision."

The Wall Street Journal

"Indefatigable goth amplob"

The New York Times

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Sharing his personal memories of  his Communist grandmother, who taught him many songs, Timur dissects the complexity of political regimes and the songs that they require with the help of Comrade Bucket, his gloomy tormentor.

 

The project is funded through NPN/VAN Creation and Development Fund Project and  co-commissioned by Beth Morrison Projects in partnership with Miami Light Project.

Music critic Mark Swed mentions  the project in the Los Angeles Times.